comments 5

Over 40C at latitude 10

S tanding in a puddle of body sweat I imagined a day in the cool confines of my fan blessed apartment would be a sensible alternative to the 40+C temperatures at the bus stop.

Old Palms in shoreline park Limon, Costa Rica
Kathleen, my friend from Cabinas’ Selvin, is dwarfed by these Palm giants.

Limon, my intended destination for the day, is a large container port on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica and a 2 hour windows open bus ride north from where I stay in Punta Uva and would not likely offer me much more than increased heat anxiety and fluid loss in return of a day of sight seeing. I chose instead to sit quietly in the dark and ramble on here about my winter community.

Apartment #16 Cabinas Selvin, Punta Uva

I forget that March brings with it glorious sunshine and ideal swimming and beach weather but also gives in to a persistent bug population and an unbearable mid-day heat, sometimes in excess of 40C. I have many days wished to open my door and walk softly into a cool powdery snow drift with more appreciation than I would have ever shown to mother winter in the past. Bug repellant is essential in the defence of a hungry no-see-um, both inside and out and a night time a bug net stretched over my bed keeps all sorts of beasties frustrated.
Realizing that the spring solstice would soon be approaching in the north and that finally my friends and family in the northern hemisphere would be getting some warm relief from a bitter winter, it occurred to me that the extreme heat and buzzing bug populations were the result of that summer sun creeping overhead on its’ path to Canada. I was dead center in the middle of summer, or the central american equivalent of the mid july heat of home.
Drawing a map of the suns path edging up a degree or so of latitude each day from the southern to the northern hemisphere made me realize that here on the caribbean coast in Costa Rica they get a summer in early april and another in early october getting the sun both up and back. A northern summer no sooner arrives than it is gone again for another 12 months.

BUGS and BLOOMS
With my recent facination with the banana plant, I went to Wikipedia for more info.

The banana plant is the largest herbaceous flowering plant. All the above-ground parts of a banana plant grow from a structure usually called a “corm”. Plants are normally tall and fairly sturdy, and are often mistaken for trees, but what appears to be a trunk is actually a “false stem” or pseudostem.


Lesser Bougainvillea, a native of Brazil is an evergreen, climbing woody vine. Tiny white flowers usually appear in clusters surrounded by colorful papery bracts, hence the name paper flower. Single and double flower forms are available. The woody trunk tends to be twisted and the thin stem have sharp thorns and dark green leaves.


In January and early february when rainfall is plentiful (rainy season) much time is spent inside, although outside is never far away.


In temperate zones, probably the most commonly grown ornamental species is Hibiscus syriacus, the common garden hibiscus, also known in some areas as the “Rose of Althea” or “Rose of Sharon”. In tropical and subtropical areas, the Chinese hibiscus, with its many showy hybrids, is the most popular hibiscus.

th=”800″ height=”1022″ /> My facination with these massive buttressed trunked trees will someday end up as an exhibition. I forget they are home to a very aggressive biting ant which can find a path inside your shoes very quickly.[/caption]

The showy pink flowers of the Torch Ginger are used in decorative arrangements while the flower buds are an important ingredient in the Nonya dish laksa. In North Sumatra, the flower buds are used for a dish called arsik ikan mas (Andaliman/Szechuan pepper Spiced Carp)


This strange bloom seemed to be coming from the ground and showed little direction until it fully bloomed below.


It may be a Jacobina but probably not.


Heliconias are an important food source for forest hummingbirds, especially the hermits, some of which – such as the Rufous-breasted Hermit – also use the plant for nesting. The Honduran White Bat (Ectophylla alba) also lives in tents it makes from heliconia leaves.


Costa Rica has more than 30 varieties of Heliconia, hence my fascination with the variety of colours and shapes.


Just another bloom.


Clusters of mature almond trees are home to the howler monkeys


Mr Selvin Brown is up early every morning concocting some amazing fruit drink from his orchards.


Available only to the local market these yummie but work intensive mini mangoes are a delicious gulp.


A very industrious baker around the corner has been perfecting his whole wheat breads and now has an everything bagel for my morning pleasure.


Star Fruit from the exotic orchard would squeeze to a golf ball and render a full glass of juice which when mixed with a lime would twist your lips inside out.


These strange fruits are a favourite of the birds as I watch them peck away the soft furry skin to expose a mild transluscent flesh similar to the cacao and mangosteen.


Star Fruit from the exotic orchard would squeeze to a golf ball and render a full glass of juice which when mixed with a lime would twist your lips inside out.


My facination with these massive buttressed trunked trees will someday end up as an exhibition. I forget they are home to a very aggressive biting ant which can find a path inside your shoes very quickly.

Advertisements
Filed under: Travels

About the Author

Posted by

Working with @SumthngStnks at twitter to uncover the unspeakable truths of the world.

5 Comments

  1. David

    Glad to see you still groovin’. I was in LEMON a great number of years ago. It was lovely then and seems lovely now. e-mail me Bill, I’d love to talk. David, Middle Cornwall, N.S.

  2. Hi Bill

    Despite exorbitant heat down there, I think you’re looking great. We just returned from a short (1-wk) stay on Aruba. We had a simple comfy cottage against a hill, away from tourist hustle-and-bustle and explored and swam in the warm ocean. It was lovely. Returning to another winter storm warning!

    All the best

    Liz and Dick

    Elisabeth C. Kosters 210 Main Street Wolfville NS, B4P1C4, Canada 902-542-6125902-542-6125 @EC_Kosters http://www.earthsciencesociety.com

    Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2014 13:11:14 +0000 To: eckosters@hotmail.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s